John Buxton

1823-1903

By Geoff Dickinson

Transcription of Obituary in the Primitive Methodist Magazine by W.A.B.

Mr. John Buxton was born at Horseley Heath, Tipton, in Staffordshire, on February 7th, 1823. His early life was spent partly in Durham and partly in Tipton, where he followed the hazardous employment of a coal miner. Soon after his return to Tipton he entered into the estate of marriage, but six weeks afterwards he met with a serious accident at his employment which necessitated the amputation of a leg. In the year 1846 he was persuaded to go to a prayer meeting held in connection with our place at Dudley Port, and here he experienced the fulness of God’s saving grace, and from then until the time of his death he was a very useful and honourable worker in connection with the Church of his choice. At the time of his conversion, our brother could neither read nor write, but by dint of hard work he learned his letters and became a teacher in the Sunday school, at Dudley Port, where he remained until his removal to Horseley Heath. During the year 1859 he worked very hard in connection with the erection of our Chapel there, and many were the miles he travelled to beg money for this scheme, and nothing would have delighted him more than to have lived to see the day when Horseley Heath was out of difficulty.

Long before the chapel was built he led the class meeting in a cottage, in fact he was connected with our society for over fifty years, and many were the times he witnessed outpourings of God’s spirit, and heard the joy of the sinner — “Men and brethren what must I do to be saved.” He was a frequent attender at the District Meetings, and thought nothing of going ten or a dozen miles to attend a Camp Meeting, and when we remember that he had to use a crutch to help him to walk this was no small task.

From a Sunday school teacher he worked his way up to be superintendent, an office which he held for 26 years. He was also society steward for more than 20 years, and class leader for 50 years. Truly our brother was in labours more abundant.

He was a most zealous worker in our Church, a mighty man in prayer, and a most loyal Primitive Methodist. His home life was not without its shadows and losses, but throughout it all he kept in close touch with God.

Although of recent years he suffered much, yet he was never heard to complain, and whenever he could he would be present at the means of grace: though latterly very deaf, yet he paid much attention to the ministry of God’s word, and many a one has gone home inspired by his kindly word and genial smile.

His last winter was a very trying time to him but he remained true to God amid it all, and early on Monday morning, February 2nd, 1903, within a few days of his 80th birthday, the summons came and our brother departed beyond the shadows into the full glory and brightness of God.

The funeral took place the following Sunday, the first part being conducted by the Rev. W.A. Bryant, in our own chapel, after which we wended our way to the cemetery where amid many manifestations of grief and sorrow we laid him to rest to await the final coming of our Lord. “He being dead yet speaketh.”

Family

John’s parents were Moses, a coal miner, and Mary.

Census returns identify the following occupations for John.

  • 1841 coal miner
  • 1851 collier
  • 1861 coal miner
  • 1871 watchman
  • 1881 night watchman
  • 1891 no occupation
  • 1901 no occupation

John married Ann Bagnall (abt 1824-1903) on 26 December 1846 at Rushall, Staffordshire. Census returns identify seven children.

  • Thomas (abt1848-1897) - a coal miner
  • Mary Ann (b abt1850)
  • Hannah Maria (b abt1852)
  • Moses (abt1854-1929) – a coal miner
  • James (b1859) - a coal miner
  • John (b1864) – an iron miner (1881)
  • Harriet (1867-1872)

References

Primitive Methodist Magazine 1904/324

Census Returns and Births, Marriages & Deaths Registers

Note: Some Records spell the surname Buckstone

This page was added by Geoff Dickinson on 13/11/2017.

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